Month: August 2017

Keep value propositions short and sweet

Keep value propositions short and sweet

I frequently advise salespeople to focus your conversations on a prospect’s needs and goals. Mr. Carpenter, in his book, makes an equally great point that these conversations need to short and sweet.

TIP # 6 Keep value props to one or two sentences. If you can’t explain what you do and how you’re the best at doing it in two short sentences, you have a problem. Being concise is the name of the game when writing sales prospecting emails (or having conversations in the hallways) If you can’t narrow it down to two sentences, get together with your marketing department to brainstorm on how to do it.

Carpenter, E.R. Brain Dump: 167 Tips & Tricks from a Six-Figure Sales Prospecting Legend (Kindle Locations 128-131). Forest Wade Press. Kindle Edition. (content reformatted to make it easier to read on this site)

 

You don’t have to Always Be Closing!

You don’t have to Always Be Closing!

While I love the movie “Glengarry Glen Ross” I disagree that you should Always Be Closing (ABC). Instead, there are times when you simply need to ask an honest question and get an honest answer. I was reminded of this while reading “Brain Dump: 167 Tips & Tricks from a Six-Figure Sales Prospecting Legend” (citation below).

TIP # 32 If you’re notified when a prospect downloads materials from your website, send a very basic email asking if they received the download. No pitch. No asking for a meeting. No telling them how you work with other companies in their vertical. You’ll get many more responses this way, and you can gradually lead to next steps.

Example:

Subject: Your download of the Fantastic Possibilities Book, Joe …

Hey Joe – I noticed you downloaded the Fantastic Possibilities Book from our website. Did everything download okay?

Best,

Your Name

Carpenter, E.R. Brain Dump: 167 Tips & Tricks from a Six-Figure Sales Prospecting Legend (Kindle Locations 220-226). Forest Wade Press. Kindle Edition. (content reformatted to make it easier to read on this site)

 

Top 9 Monday morning activities for salespeople

Top 9 Monday morning activities for salespeople

This is simply a great article so I am going to reproduce it here but please jump over to The Sales Blog to read more wisdom. I especially appreciate number 8 – Monday mornings are great for saying, “Thank you for your business!” as it sets the tone for the entire week.

I did add a number 9.

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Wait. Don’t open your email inbox. Don’t go straight into reactive mode, searching for something to do, and making your choice on what you feel like doing. Instead, do what’s most important.

  1. Educate Yourself: On your way to work, listen to an audio book, listen to a podcast, or read a book, magazine, or journal article that will help you grow and develop both personally and professionally.
  2. Prospect: There is nothing more important than prospecting. Spend the first hour dialing the phone, calling your dream clients to ask them for an appointment. No matter what happens the rest of the day, you will already have done more prospecting than most.
  3. Nurture: Call, email, or find some other way to nurture the contacts inside your dream client’s company. Share something of value, something that will help them understand something about themselves and their business and compel them to change. You need to be known as a value creator.
  4. Move Late Cycle Deals: You know that big deal you are working on that’s in the closing stages of your sales process? Do whatever work is necessary to move that deal forward. If you haven’t gained the commitment you need, do that.
  5. Move Earlier Deals: The deals that are in the middle of your process need attention too. Do whatever needs to be done to move those deals forward. (See what we have done here. We have done the most future-oriented work first by prospecting and nurturing dream clients. Then we moved on to the work around deals that are live and need attention now).
  6. Check Your Email and Respond to Voice Mail: You can’t ignore this work. Most of what is in your inbox doesn’t require your attention, but three or four emails require you do something now. Take care of what needs to be done, and leave the rest of the emails for the time you block to process email.
  7. Follow Up with Existing Clients: You sold your clients some outcome they couldn’t achieve without you. Follow up with them to make sure that they are generating the results you promised them.
  8. Send Thank You Cards: When was the last time you sent your clients a thank you card? Gratitude is the biggest of big deals. When was the last time you did something nice to say thank you to the operations people who execute what you sell? Do something to appreciate the people who trust you with their business, and the people you trust to serve your clients.

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Sean’s 9: Schedule relevant posts for the entire week on LinkedIn and Twitter using a tool like Buffer or Hootsuite.

What is your best practice for Monday morning activity? Should there be 10 or 11 or 12 items on this list?

Photo by .mollymason.

The Secret to Remembering Passwords? Ask a Magician

The Secret to Remembering Passwords? Ask a Magician

 

Password management is challenging, even for famous magicians. Teller, of Penn & Teller, tries to conjure a viable system. In sales, a good memory is not just remembering passwords but also is remembering facts about your products, your company, and your competitors – AND your prospect.

It also doesn’t hurt to remember the names and “family” facts of your prospects and customers.

You also need to make sure that your prospects and customers remember your facts so using some of these techniques (such as mnemonics and visualization to aid your prospect’s memory system).

This article on WSJ will help give you some ideas. Even better, Teller references several solid memory resources. I strongly urge you to read the article referenced below.

Source: The Secret to Remembering Passwords? Ask a Magician